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I cut and pasted the info below from a magazine article and I thought it might be useful the next time you get the opportunity for a "Grip and Grin". Sorry the pictures didn't transfer with the article.

[/b]Tips for taking great "Big Game" trophy hunting pictures in the field.65

Author with a Kudu. No shadows, rifle safely pointed away, natural background.

Authors son with a record class Blesbuck. Note the use of natural surroundings to pose the trophy. No shadows, clean natural background, etc.
How to take great "Big Game" trophy hunting pictures in the field.

As a full time professional Hunting Consultant, I receive pictures on a regular basis from hunters, clients, PH's and Outfitters. In most cases, the better part of 50% of the pictures I receive are not usable for print or online websites.

I have listed below some Hunting Picture Taking tips to take with you into the field. Follow these simple steps and you'll take pictures worthy of print, both for online and offline use.

•Never take a picture of your trophy big game animal with its tongue hanging out. It is always best to stuff it back in the mouth. You can also cut it off if it won't go back in.
•Always clean up all blood on the animal and on the ground near the animal. If there is excess blood on the ground, just move your trophy big game animal to a clean spot. Sometimes all that is needed is just a few feet. Unnecessary blood in pictures shows hunting and hunters in a negative fashion. Remember, it's not just hunters who see our photos.
•Always show your big game trophy animal in the best possible position. It is very important to be respectful to your trophy game animal and to the hunter.
•Never take pictures of your big game trophy animal in the back of a truck or 4WD. This is not respectful to your trophy animal and can add a negative connotation to hunting. Always pick a good national setting. Make use of rocks, fallen trees and any other natural flora. Look for shadows that may block out details of your trophy and move the animal till the shadows disappear. Antlers and horns look great against a blue sky. Take pictures from several angles so all tines and tips can be seen.
•Never take pictures of your big game trophy hanging from a tree, skinning shed or on a garage floor. This is not a natural setting and is not respectful to the animal. These types of photo scenes also reflect a negative association to hunting.
•Always cover all large exit or entry wounds with leaves, grass or brush. This can be done in a very tasteful manner with some practice. Look around the area and use your imagination in a tasteful manner.
•If the hunter or huntress is going to lay his/her rifle near or over the big game animal, make sure the bolt is open and the barrel is clearly pointing away from the hunter. Always check the camera viewer or display screen before you snap the picture. Even though a rifle muzzle may be pointed safety away, an optical illusion may make it appear just the opposite.
•When you choose an area to take your trophy big game photo, make sure all of the setting looks natural. Always try and avoid backgrounds with cars, 4-wheelers, blacktop roads, fences and signs. Choose your photo spot carefully and your background wisely.
•Keep a few clean small shop towels in your backpack to wipe off blood around the nose, mouth and entry or exit wound. You may need to wet your towel first. A small water filled "mist sprayer" used on the horns or antlers to wet them makes that trophy rack really stand out.
These hunting picture photo tips will work whether you are taking a picture for a friend or you are having a hunting partner take pictures for you, always keep these tips in mind and you'll have big game hunting photos you'll be very proud of! Most importantly, show respect for your big game trophy and respect for the sport of hunting we all love.

Global Sporting Safaris, a hunting consultant company, offers hunting and fishing opportunities with 75 lodges in more than 25 countries. Whether you are a bow hunter, muzzleloader, crossbow hunter or rifle hunter, we have the locations, guides and experience to put you on the trophy hunt of a lifetime.
 
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I do understand where administrators and editors etc are coming from on this subject. And there are a lot of deer hunting magazines out there, and they never show dead deer photos with any of the negative things you stated above. The best photos are of course "before" the animal has been field dressed.
Just look through a "big Buck" magazine from out west and you will see what I mean. They always pack snow in around the animal to keep the photo "clean".
On the other hand, when hunters such as myself took our dead deer pics way back years ago. We never thought about them being used in a magazine or on a website. Today I try and make sure my photos are not too offensive. But Many of the old pics I have in these threads (especially my days gone by "November Grey" thread), were taken many years ago. But they are still very pertinent to the story. I tried to choose photos from my archives that I think are fairly "tasteful" from a "hunting" standpoint. But back then everyone took photos of game on half-ton trucks. Hunters still use all kinds of "moose on trucks" and trailer pics on forums.
I can see where the blood running down the bumper pics are not a good thing. And from here on out I will take your advice and pay more attention to these details. But with older photo's its kind of difficult. And a lot of people on forums, and not just this one..."Love" old hunting pics!
 

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Thanks monsterman, It will be hard to top. But as long as I get a mature deer ill be happy, I have seen lots of good sign since season has ended and have seen a few nice bucks on camera since, hope they stick around
 
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