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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, just found this site and wanted to introduce myself. I am in the Northumberland county area and am very interested in getting into bowhunting. I have absolutely no experience in bowhunting, but have been more and more drawn to it over the past couple of years.

When the thought first occured to me, I right away went to ebay and found a guy selling his compound bow (with a cut string) and a bunch of arrows. The price was right so I bought it. Well...what a mistake that was. I had no idea what size it was, what the draw weight was...nothing. I still have that bow, but never did get it strung or have done anything with it (I am pretty sure from everything I read that it is too big for me anyway).

Anyway, long story short, I would like some advice from experienced bowhunters as to where to start? How much should I expect to spend to get a start-up set-up? What do I need, what is going to be a waste of $$ for somebody who is just starting. I don't want to spend a fortune only to find out that I suck at it/dont like it. Any direction you could give me would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks tons,
Bow_rookie
 

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You will need to get the bowhunter ed course in order to hunt but you don't need it to learn to shoot or buy a bow. Join a local archery club if you have one. There is a wealth of info available from experienced archers in your area and they are usually more than willing to help out a new shooter. Maybe even join the club before buying anything and trying out some of their rigs. Someone should be able to set you up with an appropriate rig and let you try things out. They should also be able to help you determine eye dominance, draw lenght, etc.as well
Outside of that best advise I can give is go to a good bowshop and get fitted. Find out your dominant eye, draw lenght, etc. If you have an experienced archery friend you could buy used if not it is best to buy a cheaper starter package with everything included. Sights, quiver, etc. The equipment isn't top line but you don't need that. If you get into bowhunting and you're like everyone else, you'll be upgrading in a year or two anyway. Check the easton arrow chart and buy appropriately spined arrows or have the bow shop provide the right ones. Don't overbow yourself by getting too heavy a draw weight, 50-60lbs adjustable is more than sufficient. Get one with an adjustable draw lenght as well even after being measured. Most people tend to shoot better with a shorter draw lenght than their measured lenght but the bow shop should be able to set you up initially until you become more experienced.
If you aren't experienced with bow tuning get the shop to tune your bow so that it is shooting good, your shooting will progress much faster, you will be more accurate and thus more confident in your shooting.
 

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I purchased a PSE brute field ready setup in march (same as you, didnt want to spend a pile and then not care for it - though i found out the added challenge brought a new improved hunting spark to life).

The package as is was around 599.00 ready to hunt (adjustable from 27 - 30 inch draw)

Trust me, it is addictive .

I ve already picked up a second bow and am deciding on what one to get next!


I agree with Bowtech - try some bows at a local shop/range, and dont go for the macho, i need to shoot "x" number of poundage 50-60 is fine.
You can shoot longer with less fatigue and thus you'll enjoy it more and shoot better.

Welcome to the addiction ...
 

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Hey I have a 4 year old Parker bow, 29 inch draw and 70lb pull, great condition, Left Handed. Lookin to get $200 obo let me know 435-2800
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First of all, thanks for all the input so far! Keep it coming if you can think of anything else.

Ok, so I got in touch with our local archery club and they wont be starting up for the fall season until the second week in Oct. That kinda sucks cuz I wanted to get started earlier than that.(Guess I am more of an "immediate gratification" type of guy...
)

I am left handed as far as writing and eating goes, but as far as sports I have always been right handed. I just tried the "dominate eye" test and found I am left eye dominate...does that mean that I will have to shoot left handed? I am thinking that is going to be pretty awkward for me.

Also, from what I can figure, I think my draw length will be in the 27 1/2" to 28" ballpark. I plan on taking the provincial bowhunter ed course, but am waiting on the govt to get back to me on when it is offered.

I took a long drive out to what seems to be the only local bowhunting supply store, Allison's...in Miramichi, but it was kinda tiny (its only a part of a room off of a convenience store)and there was only a young girl there who didnt seem to know anything about archery. I may have to take a trip soon, or find out when someone will be around who can help me. Kind of a long drive out there to be making too many trips.

Anyway, thanks again for all the input...and please keep it coming.
 

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Sorry to hear you got suckered. Lots of good advise here plus these days, tons of info available online in both written and visual formats to suite your learn style.

As others have said, the priorities are eye dominance, draw length, draw weight, brand choice, ready to shoot page or by individual parts and have them assembled.

Good advise, join a club and practice with other hopefully more knowledgeable shooters, shoot different brands before you buy again. To find a club near you see the AANB site

To test your eye dominance, use this test.

Only by trying bows will you be able to accurately determine your true draw length. You can measure it and get close and as stated above, better a little short then long. Check this link for DL rough measurement. Most bows are adjustable over a 2" range. Mathews for one is not, they are ordered for a specific draw length and changing it requires ordering a new Cam. Note the info on that last link regarding drwaw weight as well, 50-60 lbs will take down any game animal in New Brunswick as long as the arrow is placed properly, ie through the vitals rather then through heavy bone or cartilage.

I would offer one other piece of advice, look around and see what are the common brands are being sold around here, usually that will be a good indicator of both parts and repair personal to work on your bow. You don't want to be that guy in the car commercials where the mechanics are saying things like, "gee, never worked on one of them before".

Some shops that deal mostly with archery are, in no particular order and not a complete list either

Spencers Archery shop on Route 126 near Coal Branch
TECC archery in Sussex
Atlantic Archery Center in Fredericton (Lincoln Industrial Park)

Some multi sport shops
Fredericton Outfitters, Fredericton North
Better Buy Sports, Moncton
 

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I am left handed as far as writing and eating goes, but as far as sports I have always been right handed. I just tried the "dominate eye" test and found I am left eye dominate...does that mean that I will have to shoot left handed? I am thinking that is going to be pretty awkward for me.
Believe me, you will not regret going with a left handed bow. I was born left handed but once I started school, the teachers convinced my parents that I should be switched, why, I have no idea but I can tell you this, NOT a good thing, They know that's a bad thing to do now, sadly I must live with it. The point is I shoot right handed but am left eye dominate, I have to shoot with my left eye closed or it can take over resulting in an arrow sailing way to the right of my intended point of impact. I have read it in many forums, shooting with both eyes open results in better accuracy. So save yourself the trouble and start out right, err... i mean left.

Also, some accessories can be side specific or reversible, ie rests, sights and target quivers worn on a belt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
maybe embarassing to admit...but I dont know if I could pull a 70lb draw weight with my left hand!


Well, I guess I am just going to have to try b4 I buy.
 

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i have a 70lb for hunting now, but the 60lb (maxed to about 62lbs) gets more use when i shoot at home.
Can shoot it all afternoon with ease, the 70lb tires me out quite quickly (not as young physically anymore, mentally well thats a different story
)
mind you, you can drop a 70lb down to 60 at work up as it gets easier.- thats what i did and it doesnt take long.

Some of the more agressive cammed (usually Dual cams) 60lb bows can be hard to draw, so make sure to try them out first.
A single cam bow is usually much easier to draw and hold. (though there are a few exceptions out there now.)
 

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If your left eye dominant then and you haven't learned to shoot yet then I would definitely go with a left hand bow. you'll never regret it. Personally I wouldn't even try to pull 70lbs right or left handed
. If you can not sit flat on the floor and draw a bow straight back without raising the bow arm it is too heavy a draw weight. After you have sat for several hours in the cold and a buck steps out you don't want to have to pass on him because you can't draw your bow back or have to use so much motion to get it back that you spook him. You would be surprised how many people overbow themselves and then can't draw it when the moment of truth comes. I shoot 53lbs and never had anything I couldn't get pass throughs on unless I hit the off shoulder. Haven't stuck a moose with it yet and I would crank it up to 60lbs when and if I ever get drawn again.
There is also Sussex Outfitters (multi) and Northeast Camo (Archery Only) in Salisbury
 

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Always remember and never forget, it's not can one draw 70 Lbs, it's can one draw 70 Lbs after sitting on the stand for 2 or 3 hours at near freezing temps. I've said this to a few new bowhunters and had a few admit when it came time to draw the bow on a deer, their cold muscles couldn't draw the bow back.
What a way to learn, yet some seem to need to learn this the hard way.

Yup, Forgot about Sussex outfiters, but i don't think they have anyone on staff that knows bows but may be wrong.

Northeast camo on the other hand, too bad all shops didn't operate like him, he gives honest advice and encourages you to buy online if it will save you money and thasts hard to do, his markup is not real high. He recently told me he's not taking new customers for a while, work/life balance I guess. I know as hunting season approaches, he's full out. If you can get in to see him, when you done, you have equipment that fits and it's set up right!! On the downside, he usually doesn't have bows in stock, takes a few days to a few weeks depending on the brand and model. I waited 5 weeks for my Mathews DR2, and I'm not a bit sorry for the wait, I surfed the web, read bowhunting magazines and re-educated myself. Aside from a couple minor adjustments to my peep sight location as I got my form back in shape, arrows are flying great(as long as I release them straight), broad heads are flying with the field points without adjustments to the setup. Man, doesn't get better that that.
 

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Yes the Bow is adjustable from 60 to 70 lbs, and i belive 27 to 30 inch draw length. Good starter bow for you bow_rookie, let me know if you want to see some photos!
 

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Axle to axle lenght of bow and brace height have way more to do with forgiveness than whether it is one cam or two.
 

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maybe embarassing to admit...but I dont know if I could pull a 70lb draw weight with my left hand!


Well, I guess I am just going to have to try b4 I buy.
hey bow_rookie
dont worry about pulling the peak weight right from the start
I was in a bad head on collision and i am full of metal...literally...
i started out pulling 42 lbs on my bow
i could only shoot a dozen arrows a nite...i stuck with it and shot as much as i could...every chance i got.
now i am shooting 64 lbs as many times as i want!
and i have a metal plate in each arm...and screws holding my shoulder together!
just keep with the shooting and dont go long periods of time without shooting and you will be pulling 70 lbs in no time!
but..you dont need 70lbs to harvest a deer

best practice is to try the bow first!
 

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Longer is better on both counts. The shorter the axle to axle lenght and the shorter the brace height then the more critical your form for good accuracy.
 
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