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Thought I would share with you what 12 1/2 year old teeth look like from my 2009 buck. Data was confirmed by ring count in Montana through New Brunswick DNR.

I was making room in my deep freezer for my moose meat and forgot I kept the skull from last year's buck.

As you can see the teeth are worn BIG TIME! There is even 2 cavities on the lower jaw bone right into the bone. I used a knive to pick out the feeding debris and wheeew! What a smell. Definitely some rot going on.

I don't think this buck would haved lived much longer. When I cleaned him I found whole apples. Not apples from me but rather small ones growing wild.



 

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Thought I would share with you what 12 1/2 year old teeth look like from my 2009 buck. Data was confirmed by ring count in Montana through New Brunswick DNR.

I was making room in my deep freezer for my moose meat and forgot I kept the skull from last year's buck.

As you can see the teeth are worn BIG TIME! There is even 2 cavities on the lower jaw bone right into the bone. I used a knive to pick out the feeding debris and wheeew! What a smell. Definitely some rot going on.

I don't think this buck would haved lived much longer. When I cleaned him I found whole apples. Not apples from me but rather small ones growing wild.



I think you did this buck a favor. I don't know if they can feel a tooth ache like humans, if so he was in some pain.
 

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Generally when deer die of old age thats what gets em. Their teeth wear out and they can't eat properly and they basically die of malnutrition in the winter. In some areas with real sandy soil like south Sask for instance the deer don't live more than 8 or so years because their teeth just disappear.
 
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