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I thought it might be fun to post your favorite hunting picture(s) and why it's your favorite. Even a brief description of the hunt or circumstance.



I chased this particular deer for 2 seasons and got him in 2000.

The first year I stumbled onto this deer while stillhunting the edge of a large beaverpond. He ran toward the beaverpond and swam across to the mature woods on the other side. I found the beaverdam and crossed on the dam. I got soaked to the waist but eventually got across. After this I hunted the area for the rest of the season, finding numerous scrapes and rubs. I eventually shot a 7 point that dressed 214 pounds.
!999, I began in the summer scouting the area but no deer were on the island. Through aerial photos I'd discovered the mature woods I'd been hunting the previous season were in fact, an island. I checked the area thoughout the summer and early fall but found deer weren't using the area as much in the summer. I actually discovered a way to the island that was dry and knew with a north wind I could get to the island dry. I left a pair of sneakers on the island by the beaverdam, so if I crossed in the water I would have dry footwear to hunt with. The second week of deer season the deer were all over the island. I figured it was due to hunting pressure and getting pushed was why they went to this sanctuary. I watched many deer for many days and settled on a large-bodied 6 point the last week. I'd saw the big deer I was after a few times and saw his tracks. He had an injury on his left front foot that made it easy to tell his tracks. One side of his hoof was much larger than the other. Again I settled for a different buck. The 10 point I shot was a large deer and I was sure it was the big guy until I checked his foot. It dressed 213 pounds.
2000, turned out to be my year. After numerous scouting sessions the previous winter and early this fall, I knew how to get the deer. If I stayed dry I wasn't going to get him, he watched that crossing from a knoll where he liked to bed. He was an old deer and didn't get that way by being stupid. The first week of the season I actually hunted the clearcuts that surrounded the beaverpond and brook, knowing the increase in hunting pressure would push the deer across to the island. I decided I'd hunt the island the second week after the deer started scraping and in the pre-rut. I also knew the deer were going into the clearcuts at night, to feed but by first light were making their way to the island. If no one hunted the cuts the deer would stay there. So, I got my neighbour to hunt the cut bordering the dry crossing and I went to the wet crossing. I waded water to my waist, at first light and got to the other side of the dam. I changed footwear, had a smoke and checked the wind. It was perfect for me to sneak across the island with the wind in my favor. I figured any deer I spooked would run to my buddy as they weren't likely to cross the Digdeguash River. I stillhunted for 2 hours and was sitting next to a scrape when I heard a deer on another scrape. I searched through the underbrush, with my eyes, trying to make out a deer. The noise stopped and then I heard it again but it was much closer. I could see antlers above a small fir and then legs below. I raised the rifle and peered through the scope. I had no shot but kept watching. Finally. the deer moved from the fir and stopped, broadside at 35 yards. At the shot, the deer kicked his hind legs and charged straight ahead, out of sight. I lit a smoke and sat still listening for the sound of the deer going down. I felt pretty sure where I'd hit him and couldn't understand what had happened. It should have been heart-lung area and he should be down. Finished my smoke and went to where he was standing when I shot. There was lots of blood and hair. I looked in the direction he had bolted into and could see his antler sticking up. I went over and he was done. I sat and looked at the deer and then noticed the front foot. It was the one I'd been after. He wasn't nearly as impressive as he had been the previous seasons. His antlers had 8 points but weren't nearly as wide as they had been 2 years previous and he was quite white around the nose. I sat there, and thought about the previous seasons and the history we had. I was interrupted in my thoughts by a loud whistle. My buddy had come across the dry spot and was making his way toward me. I knew he wasn't that far away so I yelled to let him know where I was. He helped me field-dress the buck and said he wasn't nearly as big as what I'd described. We checked his teeth and most were wore down, practically to the gumline. We went back the dry way and I knew it was an easier drag back to the beaverpond, plus we could get the ATV to the dam very easily. We went and picked up the canoe and took it in by ATV to the dam. My buddy got in the front but was moving so much I got him to sit on the floor. He explained he was bottle-assed and very uneasy in a canoe. He had left his rifle at the bike and, now, I knew why. We made it to the other shore and it was the longest 50 yards I'd ever had in a canoe. We drug the canoe to the deer and loaded him in. I drug the deer back to the water in the canoe. It was actually a very easy drag. I told my buddy he could cross on the beaverdam as there was no way I was upsetting and losing the deer in the pond. He took this picture as I was paddling across.
 

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That is an awesome picture and great story Sako. I have a couple pics that I will have to hunt around for and get scanned before I add the details.

I have just got to get a deer on the deadwater that I hunt on. Be nice to also get a deer pic of a deer loaded in the canoe!
 

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This is my buddy Patty with his Big Horn sheep. This guy was one of 3 legal rams that dragged him up and down those mountains for 3 days before he finally got a decent crack at this guy. I love the picture because it shows how rugged the terrain is and you get some idea of how big those hills really are when you choose to chase sheep around the mountains. Its a pretty physical experience and there are no ATV's or horses going to get up to pack that fella down, just some good friends, a pack frame and and that sheep had to be taken up over that hill he's on and back down the other side to a place where you could get a 4 wheeler. Took more than one trip too. I also like Patty's big s*** eating grin also..kind of tells the whole story.
 

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Nice picture, Daveyn. Something I always wanted to do in my younger years. Takes a different kind of person to hunt sheep. You've got to be in great shape and be as stubborn as a mule. Congrats to your buddy, it's quite an accomplishment.
 

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Sako: I love that pic! The background kind of reminds me of the dead waters at the far end of my Malarky Brook area. The pic really explains...(without the need for words) the "mood" of the end of a successful hunt. It would make a really nice calendar photo!

I have a few hunting photo's that are really special to me, so it is difficult to pick just one. But if I had to, it would probably be this one. This is a pic of my wife and I, with a nice ten point I took in 1988 on the steep ridge at the Grand John. It was just about noon, and I saw the sun reflect off his antlers. I love the way the pic shows us with the deer, minutes after he was taken. A beautiful day (though bitter cold). Not a bad photo for just having the camera set up on a log! If you want the whole story, it is in my November Grey thread.

 

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Nice pics!

If I got drawed for sheep in Alberta I always thought that it would be easier to move my family to live at the kill site until the meat was all gone than pack it off of those mountains on foot.
 

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Daveyn: Nice pic as well. What a view eh? I can't imagine hunting in a place where you don't have to worry about "trees" hiding the game!
Thanks, problem is there are no trees hiding you either. They can see you coming for miles.
 
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