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I'm looking at getting into coyote hunting... and thinking of getting a Fox Pro electronic call. I'm curious if any of the guys hunting dogs are using them and having any luck with them?

Before I place an order to Cabelas I'd love to some feedback!
 

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I've got one, very pleased with it, very loud and good choice of calls, depending on which type you buy you can domnload more calls on it. the remote is also a good feature, I can turn mine on from at least 300 yards away in open areas. Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've got one, very pleased with it, very loud and good choice of calls, depending on which type you buy you can domnload more calls on it. the remote is also a good feature, I can turn mine on from at least 300 yards away in open areas. Ron
Which model do you have Ron?
 

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I'm looking at getting into coyote hunting... and thinking of getting a Fox Pro electronic call. I'm curious if any of the guys hunting dogs are using them and having any luck with them?

Before I place an order to Cabelas I'd love to some feedback!
My buddy uses the Spitfire, he likes it alot.
I use a Miniska, it works well; but I have had some trouble. My remote does not like the cold and the recharger burned up.
I would say maybe try ebay for a better price than $200 to start out.
One thing for sure is that remote control E-calls are a must. When the dog comes to the call he will zero in fast and be looking for the call. In tight covers getting the call away from you will help.
Never go out with only your E-call; batteries go quickly in cold weather. Always carry a good mouth call; I use the Predator Quest calls.
Good luck and Kill'em All!!
 

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Coyote hunter brought his to work for me to see and I had to get one. The sounds on them are great. Mine is the middle model(cant remember which one). they all play the same sounds. The more exspensive ones I beleive will only hold more sounds. The range on them is great in an open field. Battery life is not bad either.
 

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My model is the XR6, it has 2 speakers and has 16 calls downloaded, here are some of the calls that I have on it;1 challenge howl,2coyote female invite,3coyote pup distress,4 red fox, 5 raccoon fight, 6 cottontail,7baby cottontail,8 jackrabbit, 9woodpecker,10 mouse squeaks,11 deer fawn distresse,12 buck grunts,13 dying crow, 14 geese, 15 gobbles and yelps, 16 grey fox, you can also go on the fox pro web site and substitute some of these calls for other types, ex. moose calls and bear calls. I get a lot of response on the female call in the winter and the rabbit calls are good all the time. hope this helps your discision. Ron
 

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You fellas with the electronic callers, I have a few questions.
Where do you set them up? Roads? Choppin's? Fields? Pastures/
Where do you set them in relation to the wind? Where do you make your stand in relation to the wind and the caller?
Which call works best for you?
Do you use certain calls under certain conditions or just pick one and give 'er?
From where do the coyotes come to the call? From downwind? Upwind? Crosswind?
When you nail them, are they at the call, near the call, coming to the call, half a mile from the call?
Thnx!
 

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Here's my two cents worth!I'll set up any where I see activity as long as it's legal shooting, I look for rabbit territory, that's their main food source, they could be anywhere else but your odds are better. As far as setting up for wind, I find that the wind tends to swirl around in a lot of open fields and choppings so I try to set up in a cross wind from where I think the coyote is going to come out and hope for the best.I use my caller in two ways, 1- to locate coyotes and 2- to bring them in range. I get a lot of response on the female call,but the rabbit distress is the best to bring them in, that's like a dinner bell for them, they can't resist it, they have to check it out because they are thinking some other coyote is in their kitchen having their food. Some people have success with bird calls like woodpeckers and crows especialy because when you get 3 or4 crows calling that usualy means that they are at a food souce of some kind and the coyotes know this. As far as where they come out, it could be anywhere so keep you eyes peeled, I've had a coyote walk come out behind me and walk rigth pass me at about 20 feet and never look at me because he was so focus on the call { that was his last mistake, lol }. I try to set up my caller anywhere from 50 to 100 yards from me often to the side as long as it's practical, as for do they go to the call well some will walk rigth up to it and some will hang up a ways and look for movement. Coyotes are very smart and very chalenging to hunt, maybe more so than deer or moose and most times they will try to circle down wind to investigate. I don't spend a long time in one spot, 15 to 20 minutes stands and I'll call in 30 to 45 seconds spans and wait 3 to 4 minutes in between calls and make sure you have some binoculares to glass around cause a lot of times they come out to the edge and look around for a few minutes to see what's going on. I also wear some camo, coyotes have a very good eyesight so try not to move to much, in the fall we must wear hunter orange and I've read that the coyotes cannot see this color as orange but a shade of grey but still you'll stand out as a big grey spot so try to break your outline with a small bush or someting, in the winter I wear a full winter camo suit, white with branchs on it. As a lot of you know once you get one this way your hooked it's a lot of fun. A couple of things to remember is that the coyote is very smart and most times he will outsmart you so don't get discourage if it takes quite a few stands to get one, another reason for 15 to 20 minutes stands is that if nothing shows up in that time, chances are they are not there or they have spotted you, happens more than you think, coyotes have a 10 to 15 square miles territory so you could be the best caller around if the coyotes are not there no amount of calling is going to bring them out so move on to another spot. Have fun with it and don't get frustrated. Ron
 

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Thanks for the response CH.
I've been thinking of getting one of these machines for some time and I think this is my year.
My mouth calling sux.
I made my own electronic caller which is really cool to do, but the battery alone weighs so much it's hard to carry all that crap in the woods, especially thru the snow.
Thanks again.
 

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I went out this afternoon to play around with my 22-250 and took my Johnny Stewart attractor call($40) with me.I placed the call 50 yards from me and within 1 minute of turning it on after I was settled in(Used cottontail in distress) I had a large hawk land in a tree about 20 yards from the call and a large coyote 30 yards to my left which saw me before I saw him and couldn't get the gun on him before he was in thick cover.I also had 2 blue jays and 3 Canada jays come to the call and they all took a turn landing beside it and pecking it.All of this took place within 10 minutes.Can't wait to get back into the camo clothing and have at the yotes.
 

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Here in my area around the Tobique I hunt areas of fresh winter cuts and deer yards. Winds is a concern but I will go for fields of view and shooting lanes as my top concern. All distress calls work well at bringing them in, even if you do not see them they do come; I believe this. Vocalization calls at dawn will locate them which helps to build confidance in the area. As soon as you call be ready! I have had them charge out only yards away. This year I am going to use a shotgun more.
Do not be displeased with hand calls, they sound better than they do to the caller.

Good Luck, Mike
 

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Yes be ready for sure! Learned this the hard way, like predator hunter said, I got to this nice spot full of coyote tracks and I figured I'd give a couple of quick calls on my hand call and I wasn't done calling with the call still in my mouth and my gun still on my shoulder that this black coyote steps out about 30 feet away from me and stairs rigth at me, tried to take my gun and shoot but he ran off as soon as he saw me move for my gun. Now my gun is always ready before I call.
 

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Thanks for all the info.
You guys seem pretty happy with your machines.
Is there anything you would do differently? For example, is there anything you DON'T LIKE about your choice of machine?
I've made up my mind to get one and have started saving my pennies.
 

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I have the FX5 works great! ..But nothing better then a bait pile of old meat! I have called a few but there a smart animal! good luck!
 

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I tried the old-meat trick. No luck.
I put an entire dead calf out last year. Not a bite taken out of it all winter.
All I caught was sh*t from a neighbouring landowner who was mad that his dog got into it.
All good stuff tho', please keep the ideas comin'!
 

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Last yaer I used a MP3 player, hooked up to a car amp, with a horn speaker, all powered by an ATV battery.
Made a hell of a noise, but I didn't have any luck.
I downloaded the calls off Varmint Al's web site, hooked everything up with RCA cables and stuffed it all into a big Tupperware box.
That sucker weighed about 100 lbs, or so it felt after a day of lugging it around.
To me, it sounded good. No distortion that I could hear. I strongly suspect my two hunting partners had a role to play in my inability to draw something out of the woods, since neither of them can sit still for even five minutes, and both chain smoke.
After several pleas, and then several warnings, that if they can't sit still and not smoke for 20 mins., then maybe coyote hunting is not for them, this year I'll be going at 'er alone.
The final straw came when I finally seemed to make them understand that they had to shut the **** up and sit down (they somberly promised to do so) and then I poked my head up to see one of them walking around (he later said he had to go to the bathroom) and the other one standing up walking around smoking (said he might as well as the other guy had to go to the bathroom.)

I will be flying solo this winter.
 

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One really good source for all info is the magazine 'Predator Xtreme'.
Beavers are great for bait. I have even dragged them behind the truck on logging roads to scent into areas.
With bait hunting; crows and ravens are great attractors. If you use a calf take chainsaw to carve it up a bit or skin the hide back. I have even mixed up kool-aid to put on the snow to get the birds to start a new bait. Keep your bait station back as far as you can shoot. The time can be long and cold, but keep at it and do not give into the temptation to smoke the crow. lol.
 

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Sounds like great stuff Pred. I knew beavers were great for bears but never even thought of using them on coyotes.
Is it legal in NB for someone to have possession of a beaver without a trapper's licence, though? (No prob. for me, I have my trapping lic., just wondering in case others want to tap into your idea which sounds great BTW.)
ALso, that might explain why we had no action at the calf. We just dumped it about a 1/2 mile deep in the bush, and although there were lots of canid tracks all over the area, no doubt the poor calf carcass just froze solid, then got buried by falling snow and they likely never even knew it was there. Hell of a lot of work for no return on the investment of time and energy. (The dead calf was free at least, ha ha.)
Thnx!
 

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At times I've seen livestock lay a long time without being touched even by bears. I heard someplace it was due to medications given the animal.

Other times the cow carcass will be cleaned right up.

A good source of bait is beef bones from the butcher and as much fat with them as you can get. Ravens will go for the fat big time attracting the coyotes.
 
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