New Brunswick Hunting Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Everyone's heard some, let's hear more. One of my favourites was always "Once a spike, always a spike". Here's an interesting article about how that's not true.
http://www.petersenshunting.com/content/shooting-spike-bucks

Whether or not you know for sure that they are true or not, I'd like to hear about them, maybe we'll be able to debunk some, or maybe we'll all learn something
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I remember as a kid everybody in town was stopping by the neighbours place to see the albino 4 point he had shot.I kept hearing talk of how he was going to have bad luck.I say peel off the white hide and your good to go! lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
Good read but not new...Quality Deer Management Association who is made up of most of the top whitetail researchers and biologist in the continent has a bunch of article on genetics, antlers, vision, hearing, etc. Makes for some good reading on actual research and not observation.

http://www.qdma.com/what-we-do/articles/

Saying that I did meet a guy last year who believed that a spike will always be a spike and that only the biggest bucks bred so if you shot the big bucks no does would get bred
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
565 Posts
You can tell a buck track from a doe track by the way they drag their toes in the snow is a myth. Buck and doe tracks are exactly the same except sometimes you can find an unusually large track that leaves a deep impression from the weight, other than that you can't tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
i always thought that a buck track had more of a gap in the middle of the hoof and that the back of thier foot made 2 little inpressions the size of marbles... and a doe track is alot more pointed at the toe...so your saying you cant tell a doe track from a buck track??? i have seen both types of track in the mud over the years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You can tell a buck track from a doe track by the way they drag their toes in the snow is a myth. Buck and doe tracks are exactly the same except sometimes you can find an unusually large track that leaves a deep impression from the weight, other than that you can't tell.
I've read that one and heard it several times, I never took much stock in it, pretty common belief though. My grandfather always used to say it was the does that were dragging their feet and had more rounded toes, he always said all women are too lazy to pick up their feet when they walk, why should deer be any different?


As for Brown101, the two little marbles you speak of are the deer's dew claws, and both Bucks and Does have them. There is a belief that does have a more balanced walk and don't leave the dew claw marks, but I think that probably falls in line with what Daveyn says as a myth.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,759 Posts
You can tell a buck track from a doe track by the way they drag their toes in the snow is a myth.
Due to a large bucks girth, they tend to to NOT step into their front track with the rear hoof (spacing between), where as a smaller doe can and does step into the track..(rear hoof print in front print more often)
Thats what i was taught ...
 

·
Former Mod
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
The bucks I track in snow (when and if this occurs anymore here in New-Brunswick; ie: milder falls), there's no mistaking for does.

Most of the time a lone track, cuts accross a terrain feature consisting of heavy thickets, cedar swales or some other type of nasty cover, the type of stuff we don't like to hunt in!

Dew claws heavily imprinted in the back, and a deep wide track usually indicates to the tracker a 200+lbs buck is at the end of the trail.

Does will drag there feet maybe, but a mature buck's gait is most often dragging...don't ask me why...it's right hind foot.

Catching up to it, just even to catch a glimpse, is an entirely different topic altogether.

Still not convinced? Then call up the Benoit family in Maine and ask their opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
I have done a lot of tracking and it is absolutely true that you cannot tell the sex of a deer from a single track. However, any tracker worth the wool pants they are wearing should be able to sex a track/trail in snow within a 1/4 mile or so.

Bucks will leave some very specific sign:

  • A mature buck that is not being chased will very obviously step out of the way of narrow openings between trees, or you will notice a side step if they going close by the side of a single tree
  • Fresh rubs and/or scrapes made along the track
  • Antler marks in the snow when they pick some feed up off the ground
  • A bed with antler marks from the buck dropping it's head
  • A bed with urine stains near the center (urine stains for a doe bed are closer to the back
  • Spread out urination marks ahead of the rear hoof prints- this might only mean a couple of inches spread, we are not talking fire hose here
    . A doe will urinate in line with the back hoofprint and it will be a neater hole. (think - bucks don't have hands to hold it steady!)
  • As mentioned before, a big buck will walk more flat footed and the toes will likely point outward more. ( This is only pronounced with really big fellas)
Don't just follow a big track without taking all the sign into consideration. My brother spent an entire day following the biggest track he ever saw ( he is much less experienced). When he finally caught up to the deer, it was a huge old solitary doe. Reading the sign will tell you if it is a buck or a doe you are chasing not just reading a track.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top