New Brunswick Hunting Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been using my model 94 Winchester 30-30 for 20 years now since it was handed down to me from my father when I got my first hunting licence when I was 15 y/o. Never used anything else, although I did get a semi 308 Rem when I was a teen but gave it to my dad as I liked the 30-30 better, and just borrow it when I go out for moose (rare as my family lives in Ontario). Anyway, I have been thinking of getting something for backup as my old Winchester is getting old and I would hate to have it gimp out on me in the middle of a hunt and have no back up other than a 12gage. I would like to get into moose hunting more and have been thinking of getting something good for moose and backup for deer if ever needed. I have never used a British 303 but see them all the time for next to nothing. Just wondering why? alot of other heavy rifles are $600+ used for bolt actions, but I never often see a hunter using a 303. Can anyone give me some info on them, why they are so cheap and why they seem to be at the bottom of the list for perferred hunting rifles?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
You are referring to the surplus Lee Enfields chambered in 303 British.
In NB they tend to be almost as popular as the Winchester 94 in the deer woods. Not sure why you haven't seen many.

The reason they are so inexpensive is that they were so many of them available after WWII. Almost every sporting goods store, hardware store, gun shop and even department store offered them. And they were available for next to nothing then.

Many companies such as Parker Hale bought up thousands of them and did commercial sporterizations to them.
lots of folks did their own sporterizations by cutting off wood and adding different sights or scopes.

The .303 British cartridge is a great cartridge and will easily harvest deer. moose and bear.

As to why they are not the preferred rifle/cartridge, perhaps it has to do with marketing or simply folks want to use something new. Sort of like why don't we see many 1970s vintage cars driving around as daily drivers. Manufacturers tend to be pushing magnum calibers right now and many hunters feel that they need a magnum to kill a deer. As you have experienced the 30-30 will harvest a deer without any trouble. Consider that the .303 British is much more powerful than the 30-30. Probably the only real drawback to the 303 British is the relatively small offerings of ammo, even though all the big ammo companies offer 303 British cartridge in their lineups. Bullet choice is usually only 150 or 180 gr. Not that a deer, moose or bear really cares as both work very well.

A 303 British is a great cartridge and would serve you very well. You just need to decide if want a surplus sporter or a retail sporter (Parker hale, etc.).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply Woolly! You have put to rest something I have pondered for quite some time now. Sounds like the type of gun for me, as much as I like to look at all those fancy new rifles I would be spending more time treating it like a baby in my arms making shure it doesn't get a scratch on it then I would spend looking for the animal lol. Mind you, I would like to have one of those fancy new rifles some day for the gun range to show off a little lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
[I have been using a 303 for 40 years. I have shot deer Moose and bear. The rifle is very accurate and with 180 GR bullets in is all you need. Try and get one of the factory sportorized models such as a Parker Hale they are nice. quote name='Winchester' date='22 September 2010 - 01:27 PM' timestamp='1285172868' post='5889']
Thanks for your reply Woolly! You have put to rest something I have pondered for quite some time now. Sounds like the type of gun for me, as much as I like to look at all those fancy new rifles I would be spending more time treating it like a baby in my arms making shure it doesn't get a scratch on it then I would spend looking for the animal lol. Mind you, I would like to have one of those fancy new rifles some day for the gun range to show off a little lol

[/quote]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
I agree with soldier, I have been using a 303 since i started hunting about 10 years ago. I now have two of them that were passed down from both of my grandfathers. They have never let me down. I always use the 180 grain bullets and have had no problems with taking down deer. The only reason i see that some people don't like them are like wooly said, they're not shiny new, and if you look at ballistic tables comparing them, a 308 will shoot a little flatter and farther, but as long as you're not shooting past 200 yards there's not a whole lot of difference. The winchester website has a neet ballistics program where you can compare the trajectory of different calibers and rounds if you want to compare it to the 30-30 you use now. www.winchester.com/LEARNING-CENTER/Pages/Ballistics-Calculator.aspx
And like also wooly said, there are lots of them out there, but they're pretty well all still kicking. I have read articles that compare them to an AK-47 in terms of durability.
If you want more information on the rifles themselves just do a quick google search for Lee Enfield rifles. The two i have are mark 4's with the stock redone after the war, most of the pictures you will see will show the stock going all the way to the end of the barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Winchester I have a lot of respect for the .303 . I carried one my Grandfather gave me on my first deer hunt many moons ago up until this year. They are tough and hit hard inside 300m.Much as I like them ,there are some draw backs. Foremost is age. Many of these old war horses have been around since before WWII, some even saw WWI. Suprisingly there are not a great deal of parts readily available for these guns either so if you are looking at one make sure it is in very good shape and the barrle is'nt shot out.Another draw back is wieght,they are by no means a feather wieght and can feel like hauling a cannon by the end of the day.As much as I love the rifle my advise is look for a newer gun. You can get set up with a new Remington 770, Savage Edge or the new Mossberge rifle in a variety of calibers for around 455.00. Yes you can often get a Lee Enfield for 150 - 200 but there is a reason why they are so cheap. One in realy good shape is going run 250-300 anyway. But, if your heart is set on a Lee Enfeild get and enjoy it, just be chooey and pick a good one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
Hey there, I must say it is the only gun in my arsenal that I trust 100%.I have shot moose and deer and I have never had to run after an animal yet.It is a heavy hitter and straight as an arrow, if the animal runs you probably missed it...lol.But on that note I wouldn't buy one until trying it of course,I have heard some horror stories to.I was lucky, paid $125.00 for mine, it has open sites and the only thing I can say about old thumper is it aint all that pretty but she gets the job done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Winchester.I have a 303 Ross rifle that I take every year since 1969 when my father gave it to me.I take it 6 or 7 times a year. There is nothing wrong with a 303.But I hunt mostly with my Remington model 700 mountain rifle in 270 cal.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top