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Does anyone have any thoughts or perspective on the pros and cons of buying a crossbow with the plain bow verses a compound set up ( pulleys ) on the bow ? Some say the plain one like the excalibur style is better less parts less chance for problems . others seem to prefer the compound . if two same brand crossbows list the same arrow speed 330 fps , would the only diference be that the compound would be easier to cock ? How much arrow speed should a person be looking for when we buy?
 

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The main reason I bought a TenPoint CLS was for the size. It's so nice and compact! Only 17 inches wide when cocked. CLS stands for Compact Limb System. It has wheels like a compound. Excalibers are very wide with the recurve limbs. My Tenpoint is 330 feet per second. Most of the higher end crossbows are 330 or better. The wheels do help pulling it back.

Scott
 

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I think each have their pros & cons.

Recurves have less moving parts and therefor less to break (I break a string and I just slip on a replacement) but they have a much wider profile and require a greater effort to draw back (of course, many cocking aids virtually eliminate this issue).

Compounds require much less effort to draw back and (generally) have a much sleeker, narrower profile, allowing for greater movement through the bush. Of course, anyone who owns a compound bow can attest to the fact that when you break a string or cable you'll be out of the woods until you can get to your local bow shop for a repair.

I guess it all comes down to your personal preference.

Honestly, even though I own a recurve, I'm not such a purist that I wouldn't own a compound at some point. My all time favourites have to be the PSE Tactical Assault Crossbows - TAC15, TAC10, TAC15i, & TAC10i

If I was going to go to the dark side, this would be my Deathstar.
 

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Now since the PSE Tac is built on an AR style platform would it be considered restricted or prohibited in Canada???
 

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Personally I like the compound style, because they are generally faster and narrower profile.

If you break a string with either I imagine you would be out of the woods until you can get on a replacement string. Firstly most don't carry a spare and secondly, if it broke I doubt you'd be able to bend the limbs without an aid to put a new one on. In my 25+ years of bowhunting I have yet to break a string. Not saying it can't happen but if and when it does I will be done hunting for that day regardless.

Here is my Stryker, fastest production crossbow out there baby. Upgraded the scope with a Hawke SR, IR graduated reticle. Put a bipod adapter on it and picked up a Harris S25 pod which I'll switch between the Crossbow and the 22-250.
Only thing I don't like about it is it doesn't come with a bow mounted quiver.

 

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Very nice.

Here's my baby:

Of course, that's a pic from the website I ordered it from (I haven't taken any really good pics of mine yet) but you get the idea. I've added a 4 reticle red dot sight, as well as a $40 "Canadian Tire Special" laser sight, complete with pressure switch (just for kicks so me and my son can have some fun doing target practice). It came with a crappy 4x20 Tasco scope (usually the type mounted on BB guns) that was more trouble that it was worth, not to mention it looked like garbage, so I tossed it back in the box. Maybe I'll put it on my son's pellet gun some day...

As for the PSE, that's a good question. An AR-15 as a rifle is a restricted firearm, however (as we all know) Crossbows are no longer restricted in NB, so I guess you have to start looking at it from a legal aspect:

According to the Criminal Code of Canada, a restricted firearm is:
  • a handgun that is not a prohibited firearm;
  • a semi-automatic, centre-fire rifle or shotgun with a barrel length less than 470 mm (18.5 inches) that is not prohibited;
  • a rifle or shotgun that can fire when its overall length is reduced by folding, telescoping or some other means to less than 660 mm (26 inches);
  • any firearm prescribed as restricted (including some long guns).
Now, when you consider that the TAC15 and TAC10 models mount on the AR-15 receiver, I guess one could make the argument that they fall in to the restricted category, but then again, since they are no longer considered "Firearms" under the law once they have been converted to crossbows (just "weapons") the whole point would be moot.

Remember, it's not the receiver itself that makes the AR-15 restricted, it's the mechanism, so I would have to say that the PSE TAC15 and TAC10 models would not be restricted, though you would have to already own an AR-15 before you could even use them.

Of course, you could just avoid the whole mess alltogether (and avoid having to purchase an AR-15 before you get the PSE crossbow attachment) and just purchase either the TAC15i or TAC10i, which both come as an integrated unit, without the need to have an AR-15 to mount them on.

My 2¢

~On the string side of things~

I personnaly carry 4 spare strings in my case at all times (I'm anal) and I have an excalibur stringing aid that makes life a whole lot easier. For only about $20 it's easy to change a string by yourself (on a recurve) no matter where you are.

http://www.excaliburcrossbow.com/images/products/stringer.jpg

Too bad they don't have something this simple for compounds.
 

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Congrats on your purchase they are a ton of fun to shoot. You better watch your string, looks like it is out of the groove

Good to know about the stringer from Excalibur as well.

I have a portable Ram RatchetLoc Press for compounds but I haven't tried it on the crossbow to see if it would work but I imagine it would as I have heard guys using it on Tenpoint and Parker Xbows. I also made a homemade Bomaster portable press which I used to use before I got the Ram. I like my Bowtech Guardian that way as I don't need a press anymore to change strings or cables.
 

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Yeah, I noticed that the string was out of the groove in that pic, but that picture is the one from the website I bought my crossbow from. When I strung mine I made sure I did it properly. No sense killing yourself (or others) through stupidity. LOL

I can't imagine why they strung it that way on the website. Maybe they got the photographer to do it?
Anyone who's even had the "slightest" experience with a bow (including most people who've never handled one before) would know that wasn't right. LOL

I also purchased a quiver for it, but I found that the area on the crossbow where it is meant to be mounted interferes with the use of the stirrup when cocking. I opted not to install it so I wouldn't end up destroying my bolts by accidentally kicking them.

I plan on jerry-rigging a shin/calf-mounted quiver (using the bow quiver) this summer that will afford me some manoeuverability and allow me to carry my bolts in an easy access location.

When I get it constructed I'll post some pics to get some feedback.
 
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