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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My first sit was Wednesday (May 21st). I was in my blind and ready to go at 3:30pm, but it wasn't until 8:30pm that I finally had some action. I didn't have the GoPro camera with me that night, but I got to watch a sow with two yearling cubs feed around the bait for half an hour. When they first started coming in, the sow was alone. She started in from an old cut on my right, and when she was halfway to the bait, she stopped and stared at the blind for the longest time before deciding she didn't like the looks of it and left. All she did was circle back around and came in to the bait from the back side, through the woods. Within minutes, the yearlings came trudging in through the same way that momma came in. They filtered in and out of the woods off and on for thirty minutes before deciding to leave. That was all of the action for my first night, but it was still exciting - especially hunting from a ground blind, only 75 yards away from a sow with cubs.

Day two - Thursday, May 22nd.
I made my way into my blind at 3:00pm, and my guide went and topped up the bait barrel. Two thumbs up from me sent him on his way with plans to pass by me around 8:30pm to go top up the second bait, then he would return to pick me up at 9:30pm when it was time to case the rifle. The sun was shining periodically through the clouds, and it was warm in the blind. I have always said that I have had the best naps of my life while hunting, and this day was no exception. I knew there would be no bear activity for the first couple of hours, so I dozed off and on until 4:00pm. Everyone around camp, including myself felt that this was going to be the evening that I would see a shooter, as everything in the woods seemed to be out and about. Deer were moving, grouse were moving, moose, etc., so why wouldn't the bears be moving? At 6:30pm, the same sow and two yearlings from the previous night came in. They weren't nearly as nervous as they had been, and they fed from the barrel for ten or fifteen minutes before moving on. With the sow having come in two hours earlier than the night before, I had a good feeling that I would have action on that bait for the rest of the night. I wasn't disappointed.

At 7:40pm, a bear made his way in on the logging road, coming in from the cut on the right just the same as the sow the night before. Much like her, he stopped half way to the bait and studied my blind for a long, long time. He stood on his hind legs and tried to wind me, but I had been doused in scent killer, and so had the blind, so he was out of luck. Deciding he didn't like the looks of the blind, he turned to leave. When he hit the treeline, he stopped again and stood upright, studying me. Before long, he made up his mind that I must not be a threat, and moved back to the bait barrel. I watched him sit with his back to me as he pulled sweets from the 5 gallon pail attached to a sapling that the cubs usually use. He spent nearly ten minutes at that before going to the bait barrel and lying down in front of it as if he owned the place. When no cubs came in, I knew this bear had potential. As he lay there, I was able to size him up - he was reaching the second ring on that 45gal drum while flat on his belly. He was a shooter for sure! He pulled pawfuls of bait out of there and just laid there, munching away, not offering me a comfortable shot. Then, all of a sudden, I could hear an ATV and people whooping and hollering. So did the bear. He didn't like the sounds of that and he got up and stood facing my direction, again offering no shot. Deciding that maybe he should not be there, he turned to leave the bait, and I got my .308 up to my shoulder and began tracking him through the scope. He paused on the knoll behind the bait barrel just long enough to offer me a quartering away shot, and I took it. He jumped and spun around three times before tearing off through the woods, plowing through the brush and blow downs and making a racket as he went. I knew he had been hit hard, so I waited five minutes before going down to the bait to inspect the sign left there, and to see if he had gone down within sight. He hadn't, and I hadn't heard the death moan, so I decided to wait for Robin before tracking the bear. Knowing that Robin would be heading on the main road less than a mile away within twenty minutes or so, I headed that way and met him at the top of the hill, my thumb stuck out, looking for a ride. Of course, he couldn't miss that grin on my face, and asked, "What did you do? Shoot a bear or something?" I replied, "Yeah, something like that", and away we went back down to the bait to trail my bear.

We found him after a short walk. He had torn up the leaves with every bound he took through the woods, and after twenty yards or so, he began leaving a very heavy blood trail. Approximately a hundred yards from the bait, there he lay, on his back all sprawled out. Robin got to him first and couldn't believe the size. We had one boar on camera that looked to weigh about 200lbs, but this bear had him beat by a long shot. We got him rolled over and took a couple of pictures there in the woods before the light ran out, and I tagged him and we went for reinforcements. There was no way I could help drag him, so we needed another able body. Robin's son Ryan came out, and we brought the game cart in. I don't know how those two men managed to get that bear up out of the hole he had run to, but by ten thirty that night, the bear was dressed and hanging in the shed of the camp, and we were settling down to a celebratory beer and a hearty meal.

It wasn't until the next morning, after taking a few photos, that we hung him from the scale. The first attempt showed 240lbs, but his hind legs were still touching. After adjusting the ropes and hanging him higher, the scale read 264lbs dressed. That gives him a live weight of 300lbs! A very respectable spring bear for New Brunswick for sure! My Fall bear last year weighed 180lbs, and came back with an age of 4.5 years old from the tooth sent in to the DNR. We figure this old boar was around 7.5 years old. He is all skinned out and in the freezer, and I even skinned out the head to remove the skull to do a euro. Early estimates put his skull at 19-20", and it only takes 19" to make the New Brunswick record books. To say that I am extremely proud would be an understatement... plus, I have bragging rights at that camp now - I have the largest bear shot out of that outfitter to date!

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I do have GoPro footage to sort through before putting it up. Bear in mind that the GoPro is a Point of View camera, so sitting 75 yards away from the bait only offers you exactly what I saw while sitting there. Still, it is an interesting perspective. Hopefully on my next hunt, I'll be fully outfitted with a good camera to capture the action!
 

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Congrats on a nice bear..
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Trappercase - the outfitter was Quad B Adventures.
 

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Great bear! congrats
 
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