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As I posted I shot a decent bull in Quebec on Saturday evening at 7:30 pm with my crossbow but only was able to find it the next morning.

I had it cleaned out and rolled over onto cooler ground in heavy softoods by 10:30 am. The air temps in the moring were 3 celsius. I pryed his ribs open and let him air out laying on his back. The moose cleaned out very easily. NO issues with contamination allthough he was bloated but once the guts were out nothing smelled funny. Even after spending hours clearing a trail with a chainsaw in the back of the cutting I went over to the moose and it was cool and no bugs. It was actually cooler in the heavy softwoods then in the cutting. So I left him until I got everything cleared. I had no choice. I noticed a deep open wound just above the knee on the front leg that was pusy. It was healing but looked to be fresh in the last week. A cut about 4 inches long and deep.

Finally got it out and at the truck in the late afternoon and raced back to the trailer to pack up and head for home. I had to spend some time getting him hoisted on top of the truck rack and over my 4 wheeler. It took some time and the air temps were cooling off nicely. The moose did not smell bad inside the rib cage area. I had to cut the moose in half to get him out of the woods so it aired out nicely. I drove home that night and the temps from Campbleton to Moncton stayed around 2 to 3 celsius.

I stopped at the Irving in Moncton where the temps were 6 and loaded him with ice until Monday morning. Went to the butcher and helped out my buddy by skinning the moose. as I got down to the hump area on the side of the moose I could smell a strong rotten smell. but nothing was exposed to indicate rotting meat. I then cut the front in half right down the spine. The smell was horrible near the hump neck area but again nothing inside the rib cage cavity to indicate rot.

It was in between the muscles on either side of the hump and neck area. We cut right into the solid meat and it was green and brownish with a wicked smell. I ended up loosing about 100 pounds of the front to avoid contaminating his freezer and getting bad meat cut up. The legs were fine with no smell or discoloring.

The rear half of the moose is fine!

I'm somewhat puzzled to why this happened. Did the meat rot due to siting over night not gutted? Is is because I didn't remove the esophogous/throat until it was skinned? Either way nothing appeared to be wrong with the moose on the outside or inside after cleaning.

Just curious if a bood infection fromt he cut leg or maybe bruising from a fight may have caused this?

I did all I could to retrieve the bull and keep him cool until I got back home.
 

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From how your describing things the windpipe could be the culprit.It sounds like it stayed in the moose for 2 days while not in a cooler.I remember growing up watching my father, uncle and grandfather clean many a deer or moose and one thing they were very particular about was making sure that the windpipe was removed way up in to the top of the neck.Apparently it contains traces of partially digested food and alot of bacteria.Can't say for sure but that could have been the problem.
 

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I would say because of the depth of the shoulder/neck area the meat did not get cooled down fast enough. Had you gotten it skinned and quartered the first morning the meat should have been all right. Moose hide is a good insulator, particularly when laying on the ground all night.
 

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I agree with Frosty as this could be a windpipe issue. Also, he could have been shot, became infected or gored by another bull and the outside wound was not visible but full of infection. God knows!
 

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I would agree with redtail- the sheer thickness and depth of a moose causes them to hold alot of heat especially in the neck and hump area.
 

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We had a moose sit over night without being gutted and it wasnt quite as cold as you experienced and it was fine. Although I did reach up high in the throat to cut out the wind pipe and esophagus there was still some remaining for 48 hours. The meat was the very best. I suspect there could have been other issues. Congrats on the bull. It must of been pretty neat with the crossbow.
 

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Blood shot and bruised tissue around the impact areas will spoil first and should be cut out if you can. An old tip is to use black pepper to keep the flies off.
My buddy guides in the Yukon and they use cheese cloth game bag to wrap quarters in. They keep them cool and clean.
 

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With the hide still on the animal, you could have made what they call a ''chimney cut'', on the top portion of the neck, about 2 feet long, all the way down to the spine of the animal.

Quebecers often use this method to cool a massive amount of meat that is left unexposed in the neck / hump area, while staying over a longer hunt than us in NB.

You may want to buy the book and DVD from Yves Leblanc, renowned guide on the Gaspé Coast, that explains this cooling process.

The esophagus (wind pipe) also has to be cut WAAYYYY up in the neck area, to avoid gaz contamination, although less critical on a rutting bull that has stopped feeding. Some people tie it off as well which is a good habit.

Where about did you go in the Peninsula?

Any pics of your moose(s)??? lol!
 

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Hey Scott - I think a bit more of the story on what happened during the hunt might also help. Did he drop in his tracks, or run a bit? Did you hit him in the engine room, or somewhere else? any chance the heart/lungs could have pumped some of the ruumen uinto this part of the animal before he died? Otherwise, I think it may be just the heat issue .....Cold outside temp means little if the hide keeps the heat in.
 

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The moose was shot with a crossbow through one lung dead centre and passed just in front of the second last rib where it passed through the other lung. The bastard ran over 300 yards.

I think it's a matter of a heat issue. The lungs, heart, and liver would act as an insulator and never got cooled off until 10:am the next morning when I found him.

Photos of him are posted in the Moose category under Quebec Crossbow hunt.

I was up north of the Escuminac river around kilometer 30. Been going for 8 years now. Don't think I will go next year if I get to call or shoot in New Brunswick. Just too much running and rushing around to hunt at a place where it rains all the time and you have to deal with heavy hunting pressure with ignorant dicks that don't want any out of province hunters around them. Besides the last day of Moose season here is the first day of bow and crossbow there. Out of 9 days there was only 3 evenings and 2 mornings worth calling. The rest of the time it rained or was windy and warm. Been like that every year. One year it rained for 9 days. Not much good for calling which is what I enjoy the most. I think the quality of the moose hunt here is much better but you don't always get to go every year. I think I will save my money and head out west again.
 
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