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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been hunting the same grounds now for quite a few years, with not much luck.I know there is the odd deer in the area, seeing a fawn a year ago and the odd doe here and there.Although recently I haven't seen any signs of deer but the moose are quite plentiful.My hunting area is by a cedar bog surrounded by hardwood ridges, which according to some hunters and some of the forums in here, that this is ideal deer ground.My question is I guess is that is it because there is so many moose in the area that the deer have left?Some hunters have said that Moose will drive deer from an area, and is this true?Any info would be great always looking to learn, and yes I am trying to control the moose issue just gotta get drawn more ....lol.
 

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I don't believe they will drive the deer away but if there is lots of deer, they have a parasite in their brain that eventually gets excreted with their poo, gets picked up by slugs and snails and eventually gets eaten by other animals, deer moose, caribou, elk goats, etc depending on the area. The next phase see the parasite getting to the brain of the infected animal. The end result is the infected animal usually ends up dead except for deer which is the parasites natural host.

So if you have lots of moose around it's a pretty good sign that the deer population is lower then normal.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't believe they will drive the deer away but if there is lots of deer, they have a parasite in their brain that eventually gets excreted with their poo, gets picked up by slugs and snails and eventually gets eaten by other animals, deer moose, caribou, elk goats, etc depending on the area. The next phase see the parasite getting to the brain of the infected animal. The end result is the infected animal usually ends up dead except for deer which is the parasites natural host.

So if you have lots of moose around it's a pretty good sign that the deer population is lower then normal.

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Thanks, the one thing I do know is the moose are in healthy numbers in my area, not that thats a bad thing but sure wish there was deer in my area like there used to be.
 

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Thanks, the one thing I do know is the moose are in healthy numbers in my area, not that thats a bad thing but sure wish there was deer in my area like there used to be.
Where Ive hunted about an hour from Plaster Rock, I've seen how a moose population can run the deer out. 3 Years ago, there were a few moose in the area, decent deer population. 2 years ago, alot of moose, few deer. Last year, almost zero deer, completely dominated by moose. This year, its mostly all moose, but I did see more deer sign than last year. I assume this is just the deer population trying to comeback in an area that lost upwards of 30% of the population a few years ago.

In another area closer to plaster rock, I was seeing alot more moose the previous 2 years in an area that was dominated by deer, but this year, its back to being almost entirely deer. So it appears as though the moose have left for the most part.
 

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Cut away a 2 century old hardwood ridge, wait a year or two, spray it with vision, plant it in a monoculture stand of softwood species, and watch the moose take over....as for the deer, nobody knows where they go....hummmmmmm whatever happened here????!!!???

A prime example of these forestry practices is the Northern half of New-Brunswick, and in the last 10-15 years, most of the southern half Crown Land management.....no wonder deer are scarce....but plentiful and highly concentrated on private tracts and / or near suburban areas, which creates an entirely different problem of co-habitation altogether.

Oh and BTW, softwood does not grow well where a Maple tree grew, not the same PH, soil nutrients, etc., so why even bother?

As far as I know, Sugar Maples only grow in a few parts of Central and Eastern Canada and a few North East States, none anywhere else in the world, yet they produce a very sweet and highly in demand natural elixir sirup that everybody wants.....why then do we make PAPER with them?

End of rant....
 

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Spruce trees grow very well on sites where Sugar Maple grows, richest soils, best drainage etc., etc. It's the softwood trees that go in the middle of the tissue so you don't stick your figure through it. Maple makes the nice soft outer layer.
 

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X2 for girlscout
 
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